Sunspot region 2894 Now that was an intense one and a half week if you ask us! Sunspot regions 2887 and 2891 really kept us all on our toes. M-flares and of course the X1.0 solar flare that looked really promising with an earth-directed coronal mass ejection. But we all now how that turned out. The plasma cloud only gave us a minor glancing blow and we never got the strong G3 geomagnetic storm that was forecast. Good thing we had sunspot region 2891 waiting in the wings. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

G3 geomagnetic storm What a show! The M1.7 coronal mass ejection arrived ahead of schedule yesterday (3 November) around 19:30 UTC. That is faster than pretty much every forecast that was out there! She must have had a clear run trough space as the cloud impacted our planet with an average speed of about 700km/s. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

G2 geomagnetic storm watch The NOAA SWPC has updated their WSA-ENLIL solar wind model with a new run that includes three coronal mass ejections. A new geomagnetic storm watch was also issued, being upgraded from a minor G1 geomagnetic storm watch to a moderate G2 geomagnetic storm watch. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M1.7 solar flare with earth-directed CME What a week we are having! Hello Solar Cycle 25! Sunspot region 2891 (which is directly facing Earth!) produced a very long duration M1.7 (R1-minor) solar flare this morning that peaked at 03:01 UTC. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

CME impact expected, G3 storm watch What a day yesterday. The spectacular X1.0 solar flare (which is the second strongest solar flare of the current Solar Cycle thus far) launched a magnificent coronal mass ejection into space. Sunspot region 2887 was in a perfect earth-facing position at the time of the eruption and it was no secret that the cloud of solar plasma would have an earth-directed component. What could we expect for the coming Halloween weekend? Stay tuned! Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M-class solar flares from a new sunspot region A new sunspot region currently on the north-east limb is really making itself known today. We have had a flurry of C-class solar flares from this new region today and it even managed to produce not one, but two M-class solar flares! Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M1.6 solar flare, G2 storm watch An M1.6 solar flare peaked yesterday at 06:38 UTC. Source of the eruption was sunspot region 2882 which was in an earth-facing position at the time. Type II and IV radio sweeps were observed which suggested straight away that the event should be eruptive and thus launch a coronal mass ejection towards Earth. When coronagraph imagery became available, it became quickly obvious that the solar flare indeed launched a coronal mass ejection towards our planet. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

C1 solar flare, earth-directed CME A Type II radio emission was observed today at 06:20 UTC. It came from an amazing looking eruption around sunspot region 2871. While the eruption only peaked at C1.6, it was a long duration event which disturbed a large part of the corona. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M4.7 solar flare, G1 storm We have had a quiet summer when it comes to space weather but our Sun is starting to kick into a higher gear right as autumn approaches for us on the northern hemisphere. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

C3.0 solar flare with earth-directed CME Sunspot region 2859 produced a long duration C3.0 solar flare yesterday which launched a coronal mass ejection into space. The plasma cloud has a good chance to impact our planet in a few days time. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

First X-class solar flare of Solar Cycle 25 An X-class solar flare (R3-moderate) has just peaked! The maximum measured X-ray flux was X1.59 to be precise and the solar flare peaked at 14:29 UTC. Sunspot region 2838 is the source of this eruption. The solar flare seems fairly impulsive and due to the location of the sunspot region, any ejecta is unlikely to be earth-directed. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M flares, G2 geomagnetic storm watch Our Sun has been moderately active the past few days! Sunspot region 2824 produced numerous C-class events and three M-class solar flares during the past few days. An M1.4 solar flare on Saturday, 22 May was the strongest solar flare it produced. A couple of these C and M-class solar flares were eruptive and produced coronal mass ejections which could have an earth-directed component. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

C3 solar flare with earth-directed CME Sunspot region 2816 produced a long duration C3.9 solar flare which was associated with both Type II and IV radio sweeps. The solar flare peaked at 04:35 UTC and launched a coronal mass ejection into space. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M1.1 solar flare Surprise surprise! Sunspot region 2816 produced an M1.1 solar flare which peaked at 23:42 UTC. This is the first M-class solar flare since 29 November and the third M-class solar flare of Solar Cycle 25 thus far. Our Sun decided to wake up as we now all of a sudden have three numbered sunspot regions on the earth-facing solar disk. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Geomagnetic storming, coronal hole We’re having a couple of very interesting days at the moment with us occasionally reaching geomagnetic storm conditions. Two days ago we managed to reach the moderate G2 geomagnetic storm threshold and earlier this morning we hit the minor G1 geomagnetic storm threshold. All of this geomagnetic activity is the result of a high speed solar wind stream from a coronal hole flowing past our planet. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Filament eruption, G1 storm watch We are hopping in the way back time machine today and take you back to… Saturday. Yes… Saturday… Saturday as in two days ago. A filament eruption occurred around 11 UTC on the Sun’s southern hemisphere and launched a partial halo coronal mass ejection which could impact our planet. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Coronal hole stream arrival, new alerts bars We are starting to see some nice geomagnetic activity building up right now as a high speed solar wind stream from a coronal hole is starting to influence our planet. The north-south direction of the IMF (Bz) is mostly southward which will fuel auroral activity at Earth. Active geomagnetic conditions (Kp4) are likely in the hours ahead. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →