M4.7 solar flare, G1 storm We have had a quiet summer when it comes to space weather but our Sun is starting to kick into a higher gear right as autumn approaches for us on the northern hemisphere. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

C3.0 solar flare with earth-directed CME Sunspot region 2859 produced a long duration C3.0 solar flare yesterday which launched a coronal mass ejection into space. The plasma cloud has a good chance to impact our planet in a few days time. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

First X-class solar flare of Solar Cycle 25 An X-class solar flare (R3-moderate) has just peaked! The maximum measured X-ray flux was X1.59 to be precise and the solar flare peaked at 14:29 UTC. Sunspot region 2838 is the source of this eruption. The solar flare seems fairly impulsive and due to the location of the sunspot region, any ejecta is unlikely to be earth-directed. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M flares, G2 geomagnetic storm watch Our Sun has been moderately active the past few days! Sunspot region 2824 produced numerous C-class events and three M-class solar flares during the past few days. An M1.4 solar flare on Saturday, 22 May was the strongest solar flare it produced. A couple of these C and M-class solar flares were eruptive and produced coronal mass ejections which could have an earth-directed component. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

C3 solar flare with earth-directed CME Sunspot region 2816 produced a long duration C3.9 solar flare which was associated with both Type II and IV radio sweeps. The solar flare peaked at 04:35 UTC and launched a coronal mass ejection into space. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

M1.1 solar flare Surprise surprise! Sunspot region 2816 produced an M1.1 solar flare which peaked at 23:42 UTC. This is the first M-class solar flare since 29 November and the third M-class solar flare of Solar Cycle 25 thus far. Our Sun decided to wake up as we now all of a sudden have three numbered sunspot regions on the earth-facing solar disk. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Geomagnetic storming, coronal hole We’re having a couple of very interesting days at the moment with us occasionally reaching geomagnetic storm conditions. Two days ago we managed to reach the moderate G2 geomagnetic storm threshold and earlier this morning we hit the minor G1 geomagnetic storm threshold. All of this geomagnetic activity is the result of a high speed solar wind stream from a coronal hole flowing past our planet. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Filament eruption, G1 storm watch We are hopping in the way back time machine today and take you back to… Saturday. Yes… Saturday… Saturday as in two days ago. A filament eruption occurred around 11 UTC on the Sun’s southern hemisphere and launched a partial halo coronal mass ejection which could impact our planet. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Coronal hole stream arrival, new alerts bars We are starting to see some nice geomagnetic activity building up right now as a high speed solar wind stream from a coronal hole is starting to influence our planet. The north-south direction of the IMF (Bz) is mostly southward which will fuel auroral activity at Earth. Active geomagnetic conditions (Kp4) are likely in the hours ahead. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Coronal hole faces Earth, Sunspot region 2797 The northern hemisphere polar coronal hole which has an extension southwards has been facing Earth the past few days. A solar wind stream flowing from this coronal hole is expected to influence our planet in the coming three days. Geomagnetic conditions up to a maximum of Kp4 (active geomagnetic conditions) are possible starting today up till Wednesday (20 January). Solar wind speeds of well over 500km/s were observed last month when this same coronal hole faced our planet. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Solar wind shock wave arrived at Earth A slow shock wave arrived today around 08:25 UTC at DSCOVR. The source is unclear but it could have come from a filament eruption back on 6 January or one that took place on 8 January. The resulting coronal mass ejections were not expected to arrive at Earth but one of these two eruptions likely grazed our planet today. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

C4.0 solar flare Our Sun surprised us today! After a period of higher solar activity we are currently in a period with fewer sunspots and strong solar flares seemed very unlikely today. However, our Sun woke up this afternoon and produced a C4.0 solar flare peaked today at 14:37 UTC. A C4 solar flare doesn’t sound so spectacular but there are two reasons why this solar flare deserves your attention. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Solar activity on the rise Solar Cycle 25 is underway. That shouldn’t be news to you right? It was back in September that the NOAA SWPC came out with an official press release that Solar Cycle 25 started December last year. However, our Sun has been relatively quiet during the first few months of the new solar cycle. We had one M-class solar flare back in May and some smaller sunspot regions popping up every now and then but other than that things have been fairly quiet. Nothing out of the ordinary as our Sun slowly starts to ramp up towards solar maximum which shouldRead More →

Solar Cycle 25 has officially started in December 2019 Breaking news today from the Solar Cycle 25 Prediction Panel! It is now official, the solar minimum between Solar Cycle 24 and 25 took place December 2019 when the 13-month smoothed sunspot number fell to 1.8. This means that we’ve been in Solar Cycle 25 since December 2019! Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

C2 solar flare, SC25 slowly ramping up? A C2.0 solar flare took place this morning at 06:47 UTC from a plage region (a region without sunspots) near the west limb. A small coronal mass ejection was ejected into space but it is not aimed towards Earth. This event was kind of a wake up call as there has been little space weather activity worth talking about in the past few weeks… Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Have we passed solar minimum? The recent M-class solar flare from a sunspot region that belongs to Solar Cycle 25 was a wake up call for everyone who keeps an eye on the weather in space. Who would have thought that we would see an M-class solar flare while we are so close to solar minimum? Not many of us that’s for sure. It raises yet again the question… When is solar minimum, or when was solar minimum? Could we have passed solar minimum? We have seen a couple of Solar Cycle 25 sunspot regions during the past few weeks and this M-class solar flareRead More →

First M-class solar flare of a Solar Cycle 25 region! 925 days. That is the amount of time we had to wait since we last saw a M-class solar flare on the Sun. But today the wait is over. An impulsive M1.19 solar flare (minor R1 radio blackout) took place on our Sun this morning peaking at 07:24 UTC. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory seems to have taken a break from its sun-watching duty for some reason but STEREO Ahead captured the impulsive eruption confirming it comes from a sunspot region near the east limb from Earth’s point of view. This sunspot region very likely belongsRead More →