First M-class solar flare of a Solar Cycle 25 region! 925 days. That is the amount of time we had to wait since we last saw a M-class solar flare on the Sun. But today the wait is over. An impulsive M1.19 solar flare (minor R1 radio blackout) took place on our Sun this morning peaking at 07:24 UTC. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory seems to have taken a break from its sun-watching duty for some reason but STEREO Ahead captured the impulsive eruption confirming it comes from a sunspot region near the east limb from Earth’s point of view. This sunspot region very likely belongsRead More →

G1 geomagnetic storm, Coronal hole faces Earth Some unexpected action yesterday! The minor G1 geomagnetic storm threshold was reached on two occasions yesterday (10:44 UTC and 14:18 UTC) and a coronal hole faced our planet! Where did this mysterious geomagnetic storm come from and what can we expect from the earth-facing coronal hole? Keep on reading to find out. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

April… The month of solar minimum? Hello everyone and welcome to April. Could this month be a turn around point for us solar watchers? Is Solar Cycle 25 about to start? Understandable questions which we will shed some light on later in this article. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Solar Orbiter successfully launched into space An American Atlas V rocket has successfully launched the European Solar Orbiter satellite into space during the early hours of 10 February. This unmanned space probe is Europe’s newest solar observatory which will start to study our Sun in just under two years from now. Its main mission is set to begin in November of 2021. At closest approach, Solar Orbiter will only be 42 million kilometers away from the Sun. Scientists hope to learn more about the solar wind, the Sun’s polar regions, the Sun’s magnetic field, solar activity and how it affects Earth. Solar Orbiter is anRead More →

Coronal hole, Transit to Solar Cycle 25 A coronal hole is facing our planet today. It is a slim southern extension of the northern hemisphere polar coronal hole. The effects of this coronal hole could reach Earth on Monday (10 February) as a high speed solar wind stream could sweep past our planet and spark some more high latitude aurora displays. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Welcome GOES-16! Sharp eyes might have noticed a very abrupt drop on the solar X-rays graph today. What happened to the Sun? It went into cardiac arrest? Nope. Today, December 9, the NOAA SWPC has switched to GOES-16 as the primary satellite for geostationary space weather observations. What does that mean? Keep on reading! Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Cycle 25 sunspot region, Coronal hole faces Earth A small sunspot region has rotated into view on the south-east limb. No big deal you say? Well… it might be a sign of things to come! More on that later. We also have a southern hemisphere coronal hole facing our planet today which could spark some high latitude aurora in a few days time. Plenty to talk about today! Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Solar Cycle 25 sunspot region, Coronal hole faces Earth A small sunspot region has rotated into view on the south-east limb. No big deal you say? Well… it might be a sign of things to come! More on that later. We also have a southern hemisphere coronal hole facing our planet today which could spark some high latitude aurora in a few days time. Plenty to talk about today! Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

DSCOVR not to come back online until early 2020 As we have reported before, the real time solar wind monitoring satellite Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) which is located at the Sun-Earth L1 point is being kept in a safe hold at the moment. A glitch in its position system triggered the safe hold and that means it does not transmit any data back to Earth. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel for DSCOVR. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

SpaceWeatherLive mobile app update Happy birthday to the SpaceWeatherLive website and mobile application! Yes, our app celebrates its first birthday today and our website has completed lap number 11 around the Sun (well tomorrow to be more precise but who’s counting) and what better way to celebrate than with an update and the introduction of two highly requested features! Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Filament eruption, yet another CME The sunspot regions that have been facing Earth the past few days are slowly disappearing but our Sun continues to launch coronal mass ejections into space. A filament eruption took place around 19 UTC yesterday evening near sunspot region 2741 and a coronal mass ejection managed to escape the Sun’s gravity. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Faint partial halo coronal mass ejection Sunspot region 2740 has been much less active as it has been decayed the past few days. But that didn’t mean it went totally quiet. A minor eruption near the this sunspot region took place around midnight UTC yesterday and launched a faint partial halo coronal mass ejection that could arrive at Earth in a few days from now. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

CME passage, G1 geomagnetic storm The minor G1 geomagnetic storm was reached earlier today at 02:20 UTC. This is caused by a coronal mass ejection passage, likely the coronal mass ejection that we posted about on 8 May. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →

Sunspot region 2740, C9.9 solar flare Almost an M-class solar flare! Sunspot region 2740 (Beta-Delta) produced a very impulsive C-class solar flare this morning at 05:10 UTC. The solar flare peaked at an X-ray flux of C9.97 which is just shy of the M-class threshold. The eruption was associated with an Type II Radio Emission and several more C-class solar flares occurred as the day progressed. Space Weather Live Go to SourceRead More →