Revisiting the confrontation of the shock-powered synchrotron maser model with the Galactic FRB 200428. (arXiv:2006.00484v1 [astro-ph.HE])

Revisiting the confrontation of the shock-powered synchrotron maser model with the Galactic FRB 200428. (arXiv:2006.00484v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Yu_Y/0/1/0/all/0/1">Yun-Wei Yu</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Zou_Y/0/1/0/all/0/1">Yuan-Chuan Zou</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Dai_Z/0/1/0/all/0/1">Zi-Gao Dai</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Yu_W/0/1/0/all/0/1">Wen-Fei Yu</a>

The recent discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB 200428) from the Galactic
magnetar SGR 1935+2154 robustly indicated that FRB phenomena can sometimes be
produced by magnetars, although it is uncertain whether the cosmological FRBs
can share the same origin with this Galactic event. The association of FRB
200428 with an X-ray burst (XRB) further offers important implications for the
physical processes responsible for the FRB phenomena. By assuming that the XRB
emission is produced in the magnetosphere of the magnetar, we investigate the
possibility of that the FRB emission is produced by the synchrotron maser (SM)
mechanism, which is powered by a shock due to the collision of an $e^{pm}$
ejecta with a baryonic cloud. It is found that this shock-powered SM model can
in principle account for the FRB 200428 observations, if the collision just
occurred on the line of sight and the ejecta lunched by magnetar bursts can
have appropriate ingredients and structures. To be specific, a burst ejecta
should consist of an ultra-relativistic and extremely highly collimated
$e^{pm}$ component and a sub-relativistic and wide-spreading baryonic
component. The cloud blocking the $e^{pm}$ ejecta is just a remnant of a
previous baryonic ejecta. Meanwhile, as a result of the synchrotron emission of
the shocked material, an intense millisecond X-ray pulse is predicted to
overlap the magnetosphere XRB emission, which in principle provides a way to
test the model. Additionally, the peak frequency of the SM radiation is
constrained to be about a few hundred MHz and the radiation efficiency is
around $10^{-4}$.

The recent discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB 200428) from the Galactic
magnetar SGR 1935+2154 robustly indicated that FRB phenomena can sometimes be
produced by magnetars, although it is uncertain whether the cosmological FRBs
can share the same origin with this Galactic event. The association of FRB
200428 with an X-ray burst (XRB) further offers important implications for the
physical processes responsible for the FRB phenomena. By assuming that the XRB
emission is produced in the magnetosphere of the magnetar, we investigate the
possibility of that the FRB emission is produced by the synchrotron maser (SM)
mechanism, which is powered by a shock due to the collision of an $e^{pm}$
ejecta with a baryonic cloud. It is found that this shock-powered SM model can
in principle account for the FRB 200428 observations, if the collision just
occurred on the line of sight and the ejecta lunched by magnetar bursts can
have appropriate ingredients and structures. To be specific, a burst ejecta
should consist of an ultra-relativistic and extremely highly collimated
$e^{pm}$ component and a sub-relativistic and wide-spreading baryonic
component. The cloud blocking the $e^{pm}$ ejecta is just a remnant of a
previous baryonic ejecta. Meanwhile, as a result of the synchrotron emission of
the shocked material, an intense millisecond X-ray pulse is predicted to
overlap the magnetosphere XRB emission, which in principle provides a way to
test the model. Additionally, the peak frequency of the SM radiation is
constrained to be about a few hundred MHz and the radiation efficiency is
around $10^{-4}$.

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