Giant low-surface-brightness dwarf galaxy as a test bench for MOdified Gravity. (arXiv:2002.05161v1 [gr-qc])

Giant low-surface-brightness dwarf galaxy as a test bench for MOdified Gravity. (arXiv:2002.05161v1 [gr-qc])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Martino_I/0/1/0/all/0/1">Ivan de Martino</a>

The lack of detection of supersymmetric particles is leading to look at
alternative avenues for explaining dark matter’s effects. Among them, modified
theories of gravity may play an important role accounting even for both dark
components needed in the standard cosmological model. Scalar-Tensor-Vector
Gravity theory has been proposed to resolve the dark matter puzzle. Such a
modified gravity model introduces, in its weak field limit, a Yukawa-like
correction to the Newtonian potential, and is capable to explain most of the
phenomenology related to dark matter at scale of galaxies and galaxy clusters.
Nevertheless, some inconsistencies appears when studying systems that are
supposed to be dark matter dominated such as dwarf galaxies. In this sense
Antlia II, an extremely diffuse galaxy which has been recently discovered in
{em Gaia}’s second data release, may serve to probe the aforementioned theory
against the need for invoking dark matter. Our analysis shows several
inconsistencies and leads to argue that MOdified Gravity may not be able to
shed light on the intriguing nature of dark matter.

The lack of detection of supersymmetric particles is leading to look at
alternative avenues for explaining dark matter’s effects. Among them, modified
theories of gravity may play an important role accounting even for both dark
components needed in the standard cosmological model. Scalar-Tensor-Vector
Gravity theory has been proposed to resolve the dark matter puzzle. Such a
modified gravity model introduces, in its weak field limit, a Yukawa-like
correction to the Newtonian potential, and is capable to explain most of the
phenomenology related to dark matter at scale of galaxies and galaxy clusters.
Nevertheless, some inconsistencies appears when studying systems that are
supposed to be dark matter dominated such as dwarf galaxies. In this sense
Antlia II, an extremely diffuse galaxy which has been recently discovered in
{em Gaia}’s second data release, may serve to probe the aforementioned theory
against the need for invoking dark matter. Our analysis shows several
inconsistencies and leads to argue that MOdified Gravity may not be able to
shed light on the intriguing nature of dark matter.

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