An Accurate Comprehensive Approach to Substructure: II. Stripped Subhaloes. (arXiv:2109.06490v1 [astro-ph.CO])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Salvador_Sole_E/0/1/0/all/0/1">Eduard Salvador-Sol&#xe9;</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Manrique_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Alberto Manrique</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Botella_I/0/1/0/all/0/1">Ignacio Botella</a>

In Paper I we used the CUSP formalism to derive from first principles and no
single free parameter the accurate abundance and radial distribution of both
diffuse DM (dDM) and subhaloes accreted onto haloes and their progenitors at
all previous times. Here we use those results as initial conditions for the
monitoring of the evolution of subhaloes and dDM within the host haloes.
Specifically, neglecting dynamical friction, we accurately calculate the
effects of repetitive tidal stripping and heating on subhaloes as they orbit
inside the host halo and infer the amount of dDM and subsubhaloes they release
into the intra-halo medium. We then calculate the expected abundance and radial
distribution of stripped subhaloes and dDM. This derivation clarifies the role
of halo concentration in substructure and unravels the origin of some key
features found in simulations including the dependence of substructure on halo
mass. In addition, it unveils the specific effects of dynamical friction on
substructure. The results derived here are for purely accreting haloes. In
Paper III we complete the study by addressing the case of low-mass subhaloes,
unaffected by dynamical friction, in ordinary haloes having suffered major
mergers.

In Paper I we used the CUSP formalism to derive from first principles and no
single free parameter the accurate abundance and radial distribution of both
diffuse DM (dDM) and subhaloes accreted onto haloes and their progenitors at
all previous times. Here we use those results as initial conditions for the
monitoring of the evolution of subhaloes and dDM within the host haloes.
Specifically, neglecting dynamical friction, we accurately calculate the
effects of repetitive tidal stripping and heating on subhaloes as they orbit
inside the host halo and infer the amount of dDM and subsubhaloes they release
into the intra-halo medium. We then calculate the expected abundance and radial
distribution of stripped subhaloes and dDM. This derivation clarifies the role
of halo concentration in substructure and unravels the origin of some key
features found in simulations including the dependence of substructure on halo
mass. In addition, it unveils the specific effects of dynamical friction on
substructure. The results derived here are for purely accreting haloes. In
Paper III we complete the study by addressing the case of low-mass subhaloes,
unaffected by dynamical friction, in ordinary haloes having suffered major
mergers.

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