A Single Physical Model for Diverse Meteoroid Data Sets. (arXiv:1902.02977v1 [astro-ph.EP])

A Single Physical Model for Diverse Meteoroid Data Sets. (arXiv:1902.02977v1 [astro-ph.EP])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Dikarev_V/0/1/0/all/0/1">Valeri V. Dikarev</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Grun_E/0/1/0/all/0/1">Eberhard Gr&#xfc;n</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Baggaley_W/0/1/0/all/0/1">William J. Baggaley</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Galligan_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">David P. Galligan</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Landgraf_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Markus Landgraf</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Jehn_R/0/1/0/all/0/1">R&#xfc;diger Jehn</a>

The orbital distributions of dust particles in interplanetary space are
inferred from several meteoroid data sets under the constraints imposed by the
orbital evolution of the particles due to the planetary gravity and
Poynting-Robertson effect. Infrared observations of the zodiacal cloud by the
COBE DIRBE instrument, flux measurements by the dust detectors on board Galileo
and Ulysses spacecraft, and the crater size distributions on lunar rock samples
retrieved by the Apollo missions are fused into a single model. Within the
model, the orbital distributions are expanded into a sum of contributions due
to a number of known sources, including the asteroid belt with the emphasis on
the prominent families Themis, Koronis, Eos and Veritas, as well as comets on
Jupiter-encountering orbits. An attempt to incorporate the meteor orbit
database acquired by the AMOR radar is also discussed.

The orbital distributions of dust particles in interplanetary space are
inferred from several meteoroid data sets under the constraints imposed by the
orbital evolution of the particles due to the planetary gravity and
Poynting-Robertson effect. Infrared observations of the zodiacal cloud by the
COBE DIRBE instrument, flux measurements by the dust detectors on board Galileo
and Ulysses spacecraft, and the crater size distributions on lunar rock samples
retrieved by the Apollo missions are fused into a single model. Within the
model, the orbital distributions are expanded into a sum of contributions due
to a number of known sources, including the asteroid belt with the emphasis on
the prominent families Themis, Koronis, Eos and Veritas, as well as comets on
Jupiter-encountering orbits. An attempt to incorporate the meteor orbit
database acquired by the AMOR radar is also discussed.

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