Spectator Dark Matter. (arXiv:1811.02586v1 [astro-ph.CO])

Spectator Dark Matter. (arXiv:1811.02586v1 [astro-ph.CO])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Markkanen_T/0/1/0/all/0/1">Tommi Markkanen</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Rajantie_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Arttu Rajantie</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Tenkanen_T/0/1/0/all/0/1">Tommi Tenkanen</a>

The observed dark matter abundance in the Universe can be fully accounted for
by a minimally coupled spectator scalar field that was light during inflation
and has sufficiently strong self-coupling. In this scenario, dark matter was
produced during inflation by amplification of quantum fluctuations of the
spectator field. The self-interaction of the field suppresses its fluctuations
on large scales, and therefore avoids isocurvature constraints. The scenario
does not require any fine-tuning of parameters. In the simplest case of a
single real scalar field, the mass of the dark matter particle would be in the
range $1~{rm GeV}lesssim mlesssim 10^8~{rm GeV}$, depending on the scale of
inflation, and the lower bound for the quartic self-coupling is $lambdagtrsim
0.45$.

The observed dark matter abundance in the Universe can be fully accounted for
by a minimally coupled spectator scalar field that was light during inflation
and has sufficiently strong self-coupling. In this scenario, dark matter was
produced during inflation by amplification of quantum fluctuations of the
spectator field. The self-interaction of the field suppresses its fluctuations
on large scales, and therefore avoids isocurvature constraints. The scenario
does not require any fine-tuning of parameters. In the simplest case of a
single real scalar field, the mass of the dark matter particle would be in the
range $1~{rm GeV}lesssim mlesssim 10^8~{rm GeV}$, depending on the scale of
inflation, and the lower bound for the quartic self-coupling is $lambdagtrsim
0.45$.

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