Towards precision measurements of accreting black holes using X-ray reflection spectroscopy. (arXiv:2011.04792v3 [astro-ph.HE] UPDATED)

Towards precision measurements of accreting black holes using X-ray reflection spectroscopy. (arXiv:2011.04792v3 [astro-ph.HE] UPDATED)
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Bambi_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Cosimo Bambi</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Brenneman_L/0/1/0/all/0/1">Laura W. Brenneman</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Dauser_T/0/1/0/all/0/1">Thomas Dauser</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Garcia_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Javier A. Garcia</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Grinberg_V/0/1/0/all/0/1">Victoria Grinberg</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Ingram_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Adam Ingram</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Jiang_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Jiachen Jiang</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Liu_H/0/1/0/all/0/1">Honghui Liu</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Lohfink_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Anne M. Lohfink</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Marinucci_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Andrea Marinucci</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Mastroserio_G/0/1/0/all/0/1">Guglielmo Mastroserio</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Middei_R/0/1/0/all/0/1">Riccardo Middei</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Nampalliwar_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Sourabh Nampalliwar</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Niedzwiecki_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Andrzej Niedzwiecki</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Steiner_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">James F. Steiner</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Tripathi_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Ashutosh Tripathi</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Zdziarski_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Andrzej A. Zdziarski</a>

Relativistic reflection features are commonly observed in the X-ray spectra
of accreting black holes. In the presence of high quality data and with the
correct astrophysical model, X-ray reflection spectroscopy can be quite a
powerful tool to probe the strong gravity region, study the morphology of the
accreting matter, measure black hole spins, and possibly test Einstein’s theory
of general relativity in the strong field regime. In the last decade, there has
been significant progress in the development of the analysis of these features,
thanks to more sophisticated astrophysical models and new observational
facilities. Here we review the state-of-the-art in relativistic reflection
modeling, listing assumptions and simplifications that may affect, at some
level, the final measurements and may be investigated better in the future. We
review black hole spin measurements and the most recent efforts to use X-ray
reflection spectroscopy for testing fundamental physics.

Relativistic reflection features are commonly observed in the X-ray spectra
of accreting black holes. In the presence of high quality data and with the
correct astrophysical model, X-ray reflection spectroscopy can be quite a
powerful tool to probe the strong gravity region, study the morphology of the
accreting matter, measure black hole spins, and possibly test Einstein’s theory
of general relativity in the strong field regime. In the last decade, there has
been significant progress in the development of the analysis of these features,
thanks to more sophisticated astrophysical models and new observational
facilities. Here we review the state-of-the-art in relativistic reflection
modeling, listing assumptions and simplifications that may affect, at some
level, the final measurements and may be investigated better in the future. We
review black hole spin measurements and the most recent efforts to use X-ray
reflection spectroscopy for testing fundamental physics.

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