The Fast Atmospheric Self-Coherent Camera Technique: Laboratory Results and Future Directions. (arXiv:1910.04554v1 [astro-ph.IM])

The Fast Atmospheric Self-Coherent Camera Technique: Laboratory Results and Future Directions. (arXiv:1910.04554v1 [astro-ph.IM])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Gerard_B/0/1/0/all/0/1">Benjamin L. Gerard</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Marois_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Christian Marois</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Galicher_R/0/1/0/all/0/1">Rapha&#xeb;l Galicher</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Baudoz_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Pierre Baudoz</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Patapis_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Polychronis Patapis</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Kuhn_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Jonas K&#xfc;hn</a>

Direct detection and detailed characterization of exoplanets using extreme
adaptive optics (ExAO) is a key science goal of future extremely large
telescopes (ELTs). However, wavefront errors will limit the sensitivity of this
endeavor. Limitations for ground-based telescopes arise from both quasi-static
and residual AO-corrected atmospheric wavefront errors, the latter of which
generates short-lived aberrations that will average into a halo over a long
exposure. We have developed and tested the framework for a solution to both of
these problems using the self-coherent camera (SCC), to be applied to
ground-based telescopes, called the Fast Atmospheric SCC Technique (FAST). In
this paper we present updates of new and ongoing work for FAST, both in
numerical simulation and in the laboratory. We first present numerical
simulations that illustrate the scientific potential of FAST, including, with
current 10-m telescopes, the direct detection of exoplanets reflected light and
exo-Jupiters in thermal emission and, with future ELTs, the detection of
habitable exoplanets. In the laboratory, we present the first characterizations
of our proposed, and now fabricated, coronagraphic masks.

Direct detection and detailed characterization of exoplanets using extreme
adaptive optics (ExAO) is a key science goal of future extremely large
telescopes (ELTs). However, wavefront errors will limit the sensitivity of this
endeavor. Limitations for ground-based telescopes arise from both quasi-static
and residual AO-corrected atmospheric wavefront errors, the latter of which
generates short-lived aberrations that will average into a halo over a long
exposure. We have developed and tested the framework for a solution to both of
these problems using the self-coherent camera (SCC), to be applied to
ground-based telescopes, called the Fast Atmospheric SCC Technique (FAST). In
this paper we present updates of new and ongoing work for FAST, both in
numerical simulation and in the laboratory. We first present numerical
simulations that illustrate the scientific potential of FAST, including, with
current 10-m telescopes, the direct detection of exoplanets reflected light and
exo-Jupiters in thermal emission and, with future ELTs, the detection of
habitable exoplanets. In the laboratory, we present the first characterizations
of our proposed, and now fabricated, coronagraphic masks.

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