The Carnegie Supernova Project-I: Correlation Between Type Ia Supernovae and Their Host Galaxies from Optical to Near-Infrared Bands. (arXiv:2006.15164v1 [astro-ph.CO])

The Carnegie Supernova Project-I: Correlation Between Type Ia Supernovae and Their Host Galaxies from Optical to Near-Infrared Bands. (arXiv:2006.15164v1 [astro-ph.CO])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Uddin_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Syed~A.~Uddin</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Burns_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Christopher~R.~Burns</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Phillips_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">M.~M.~Phillips</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Suntzeff_N/0/1/0/all/0/1">Nicholas~B.~Suntzeff</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Contreras_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Carlos~Contreras</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Hsiao_E/0/1/0/all/0/1">Eric~Y.~Hsiao</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Morrell_N/0/1/0/all/0/1">Nidia~Morrell</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Galbany_L/0/1/0/all/0/1">Llu&#xed;s Galbany</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Stritzinger_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Maximilian~Stritzinger</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Hoeflich_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Peter~Hoeflich</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Ashall_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Chris~Ashall</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Piro_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Anthony~L.~Piro</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Freedman_W/0/1/0/all/0/1">Wendy~L.~Freedman</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Persson_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">S.~E.~Persson</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Krisciunas_K/0/1/0/all/0/1">Kevin~Krisciunas</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Brown_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Peter~Brown</a>

We present optical and near-infrared ($ugriYJH$) photometry of host galaxies
of Type Ia supernovae (SN~Ia) observed by the textit{Carnegie Supernova
Project-I}. We determine host galaxy stellar masses and, for the first time,
study their correlation with SN~Ia standardized luminosity across optical and
near-infrared ($uBgVriYJH$) bands. In the individual bands, we find that SNe~Ia
are more luminous in more massive hosts with luminosity offsets ranging between
$-0.07 pm0.03$ mag to $-0.15pm0.04$ mag after light-curve standardization.
The slope of the SN~Ia Hubble residual-host mass relation is negative across
all $uBgVriYJH$ bands with values ranging between $-0.036pm 0.025$ mag/dex to
$-0.097pm 0.027$ mag/dex — implying that SNe~Ia in more massive galaxies are
brighter than expected. The near-constant observed correlations across optical
and near-infrared bands indicate that dust may not play a significant role in
the observed luminosity offset–host mass correlation. We measure projected
separations between SNe~Ia and their host centers, and find that SNe~Ia that
explode beyond a projected 10 kpc have a $rm 30% to 50%$ reduction of
the dispersion in Hubble residuals across all bands — making them a more
uniform subset of SNe~Ia. Dust in host galaxies, peculiar velocities of nearby
SN~Ia, or a combination of both may drive this result as the color excesses of
SNe~Ia beyond 10 kpc are found to be generally lower than those interior, but
there is also a diminishing trend of the dispersion as we exclude nearby
events. We do not find that SN~Ia average luminosity varies significantly when
they are grouped in various host morphological types. Host galaxy data from
this work will be useful, in conjunction with future high-redshift samples, in
constraining cosmological parameters.

We present optical and near-infrared ($ugriYJH$) photometry of host galaxies
of Type Ia supernovae (SN~Ia) observed by the textit{Carnegie Supernova
Project-I}. We determine host galaxy stellar masses and, for the first time,
study their correlation with SN~Ia standardized luminosity across optical and
near-infrared ($uBgVriYJH$) bands. In the individual bands, we find that SNe~Ia
are more luminous in more massive hosts with luminosity offsets ranging between
$-0.07 pm0.03$ mag to $-0.15pm0.04$ mag after light-curve standardization.
The slope of the SN~Ia Hubble residual-host mass relation is negative across
all $uBgVriYJH$ bands with values ranging between $-0.036pm 0.025$ mag/dex to
$-0.097pm 0.027$ mag/dex — implying that SNe~Ia in more massive galaxies are
brighter than expected. The near-constant observed correlations across optical
and near-infrared bands indicate that dust may not play a significant role in
the observed luminosity offset–host mass correlation. We measure projected
separations between SNe~Ia and their host centers, and find that SNe~Ia that
explode beyond a projected 10 kpc have a $rm 30% to 50%$ reduction of
the dispersion in Hubble residuals across all bands — making them a more
uniform subset of SNe~Ia. Dust in host galaxies, peculiar velocities of nearby
SN~Ia, or a combination of both may drive this result as the color excesses of
SNe~Ia beyond 10 kpc are found to be generally lower than those interior, but
there is also a diminishing trend of the dispersion as we exclude nearby
events. We do not find that SN~Ia average luminosity varies significantly when
they are grouped in various host morphological types. Host galaxy data from
this work will be useful, in conjunction with future high-redshift samples, in
constraining cosmological parameters.

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