Testing the nature of dark compact objects with gravitational waves. (arXiv:2105.06410v1 [gr-qc])

Testing the nature of dark compact objects with gravitational waves. (arXiv:2105.06410v1 [gr-qc])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Maggio_E/0/1/0/all/0/1">Elisa Maggio</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Pani_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Paolo Pani</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Raposo_G/0/1/0/all/0/1">Guilherme Raposo</a>

Within Einstein’s theory of gravity, any compact object heavier than a few
solar masses must be a black hole. Any observation showing otherwise would
imply either new physics beyond General Relativity or new exotic matter fields
beyond the Standard Model, and might provide a portal to understand some
puzzling properties of a black hole. We give a short overview on tests of the
nature of dark compact objects with present and future gravitational-wave
observations, including inspiral tests of the multipolar structure of compact
objects and of their tidal deformability, ringdown tests, and searches for
near-horizon structures with gravitational-wave echoes.

Within Einstein’s theory of gravity, any compact object heavier than a few
solar masses must be a black hole. Any observation showing otherwise would
imply either new physics beyond General Relativity or new exotic matter fields
beyond the Standard Model, and might provide a portal to understand some
puzzling properties of a black hole. We give a short overview on tests of the
nature of dark compact objects with present and future gravitational-wave
observations, including inspiral tests of the multipolar structure of compact
objects and of their tidal deformability, ringdown tests, and searches for
near-horizon structures with gravitational-wave echoes.

http://arxiv.org/icons/sfx.gif

Comments are closed.