Sensitive Superconducting Calorimeters for Dark Matter Search. (arXiv:2101.08558v1 [physics.ins-det])

Sensitive Superconducting Calorimeters for Dark Matter Search. (arXiv:2101.08558v1 [physics.ins-det])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/physics/1/au:+Paolucci_F/0/1/0/all/0/1">Federico Paolucci</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/physics/1/au:+Giazotto_F/0/1/0/all/0/1">Francesco Giazotto</a>

The composition of dark matter is one of the puzzling topics in astrophysics.
Since, the existence of axions would fill this gap of knowledge, several
experiments for the search of axions have been designed in the last twenty
years. Among all the others, light shining through walls experiments promise to
push the exclusion limits to lower energies. To this end, effort is put for the
development of single-photon detectors operating at frequencies $<100$ Ghz.
Here, we review recent advancements in superconducting single-photon detection.
In particular, we present two sensors based on one-dimensional Josephson
junctions with the capability to be in situ tuned by simple current bias: the
nanoscale transition edge sensor (nano-TES) and the Josephson escape sensor
(JES). These two sensors seem to be the perfect candidates for the realization
of microwave light shining through walls (LSW) experiments, since they show
unprecedented frequency resolutions of about 100 GHz and 2 GHz for the nano-TES
and JES, respectively.

The composition of dark matter is one of the puzzling topics in astrophysics.
Since, the existence of axions would fill this gap of knowledge, several
experiments for the search of axions have been designed in the last twenty
years. Among all the others, light shining through walls experiments promise to
push the exclusion limits to lower energies. To this end, effort is put for the
development of single-photon detectors operating at frequencies $<100$ Ghz.
Here, we review recent advancements in superconducting single-photon detection.
In particular, we present two sensors based on one-dimensional Josephson
junctions with the capability to be in situ tuned by simple current bias: the
nanoscale transition edge sensor (nano-TES) and the Josephson escape sensor
(JES). These two sensors seem to be the perfect candidates for the realization
of microwave light shining through walls (LSW) experiments, since they show
unprecedented frequency resolutions of about 100 GHz and 2 GHz for the nano-TES
and JES, respectively.

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