Radial distributions of coronal electron Temperatures for Solar Altitudes up to Ten Solar Radii. (arXiv:2002.07495v2 [astro-ph.SR] UPDATED)

Radial distributions of coronal electron Temperatures for Solar Altitudes up to Ten Solar Radii. (arXiv:2002.07495v2 [astro-ph.SR] UPDATED)
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Lemaire_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Joseph F. Lemaire</a> (1 and 2), <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Katsiyannis_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Athanassios C. Katsiyannis</a> (3) ((1) Universite Catholique de Louvain, (2) Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, (3) Royal Observatory of Belgium)

This paper is a follow up of the article where Lemaire and Stegen (2016)
introduced a hydrodynamical (dyn) model to calculate the coronal temperature
distribution ($mathrm{T_e(h)}$) from a given radial electron density. Several
$mathrm{T_e(h)}$ distributions are presented here, corresponding to
combinations of in-situ measurements of electron density and bulk velocity at 1
AU. The results challenge the commonly accepted view that $mathrm{T_e}$ is
higher close to the transition region than further away. Further more, the
maximum $mathrm{T_e}$ can be the double of the temperature observed at the
base, making heat conductivity downwards a possibly significant phenomenon.
This has serious implications to the assumption that the corona is mainly
heated at its base, as it suggests that it might be happening a few solar radii
higher up.

This paper is a follow up of the article where Lemaire and Stegen (2016)
introduced a hydrodynamical (dyn) model to calculate the coronal temperature
distribution ($mathrm{T_e(h)}$) from a given radial electron density. Several
$mathrm{T_e(h)}$ distributions are presented here, corresponding to
combinations of in-situ measurements of electron density and bulk velocity at 1
AU. The results challenge the commonly accepted view that $mathrm{T_e}$ is
higher close to the transition region than further away. Further more, the
maximum $mathrm{T_e}$ can be the double of the temperature observed at the
base, making heat conductivity downwards a possibly significant phenomenon.
This has serious implications to the assumption that the corona is mainly
heated at its base, as it suggests that it might be happening a few solar radii
higher up.

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