Peak-Luminosity/Decline-Rate Relationship for Tidal Disruption Events. (arXiv:2001.08215v1 [astro-ph.HE])

Peak-Luminosity/Decline-Rate Relationship for Tidal Disruption Events. (arXiv:2001.08215v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Hinkle_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Jason T. Hinkle</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Holoien_T/0/1/0/all/0/1">Thomas W.-S. Holoien</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Shappee_B/0/1/0/all/0/1">Benjamin. J. Shappee</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Auchettl_K/0/1/0/all/0/1">Katie Auchettl</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Kochanek_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Christopher S. Kochanek</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Stanek_K/0/1/0/all/0/1">K. Z. Stanek</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Payne_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Anna V. Payne</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Thompson_T/0/1/0/all/0/1">Todd A. Thompson</a>

We compare the luminosity, radius, and temperature evolution of the
UV/optical blackbodies for fifteen well-observed tidal disruption events
(TDEs), eight of which were discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for
Supernovae (ASAS-SN). We find that the blackbody radii generally increase prior
to peak and slowly decline at late times. The blackbody temperature evolution
is generally flat, with a few objects showing small-scale variations. The
bolometric UV/optical luminosities generally evolve smoothly and flatten out at
late times. Finally, we find an apparent correlation between the peak
luminosity and the decline-rate of TDEs. This relationship is strongest when
comparing the peak luminosity to its decline over 40 days. A linear fit yields
$log_{10}(text{L}_{text{peak}}) = (44.1^{+0.1}_{-0.1}) +
(1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.3})(Deltatext{L}_{40} + 0.5)$ in cgs, where
$Deltatext{L}_{40} = log_{10}(text{L}_{40}) –
log_{10}(text{L}_{text{peak}}) = log_{10}(text{L}_{40} /
text{L}_{text{peak}})$

We compare the luminosity, radius, and temperature evolution of the
UV/optical blackbodies for fifteen well-observed tidal disruption events
(TDEs), eight of which were discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for
Supernovae (ASAS-SN). We find that the blackbody radii generally increase prior
to peak and slowly decline at late times. The blackbody temperature evolution
is generally flat, with a few objects showing small-scale variations. The
bolometric UV/optical luminosities generally evolve smoothly and flatten out at
late times. Finally, we find an apparent correlation between the peak
luminosity and the decline-rate of TDEs. This relationship is strongest when
comparing the peak luminosity to its decline over 40 days. A linear fit yields
$log_{10}(text{L}_{text{peak}}) = (44.1^{+0.1}_{-0.1}) +
(1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.3})(Deltatext{L}_{40} + 0.5)$ in cgs, where
$Deltatext{L}_{40} = log_{10}(text{L}_{40}) –
log_{10}(text{L}_{text{peak}}) = log_{10}(text{L}_{40} /
text{L}_{text{peak}})$

http://arxiv.org/icons/sfx.gif

Comments are closed.