On a possible nonequilibrium imprint in the cosmic background at low frequencies. (arXiv:1908.08876v1 [astro-ph.CO])

On a possible nonequilibrium imprint in the cosmic background at low frequencies. (arXiv:1908.08876v1 [astro-ph.CO])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Baiesi_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Marco Baiesi</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Burigana_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Carlo Burigana</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Conti_L/0/1/0/all/0/1">Livia Conti</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Falasco_G/0/1/0/all/0/1">Gianmaria Falasco</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Maes_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Christian Maes</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Rondoni_L/0/1/0/all/0/1">Lamberto Rondoni</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Trombetti_T/0/1/0/all/0/1">Tiziana Trombetti</a>

The cosmic background radiation has been observed to deviate from the Planck
law expected from a blackbody at $sim$2.7 K at frequencies below $sim$3 GHz.
We discuss the abundance of the low-energy photons from the perspective of
nonequilibrium statistical mechanics by specifying an evolution to a frequency
distribution fitting the observed discrepancies. We mention possible physical
mechanisms that enter the derivation of that dynamics, where a low-frequency
localization is combined with photon cooling as result of e.g. induced Compton
scattering. In that sense, the so called ‘space roar’ we observe today is
interpreted as a nonequilibrium echo of the early universe.

The cosmic background radiation has been observed to deviate from the Planck
law expected from a blackbody at $sim$2.7 K at frequencies below $sim$3 GHz.
We discuss the abundance of the low-energy photons from the perspective of
nonequilibrium statistical mechanics by specifying an evolution to a frequency
distribution fitting the observed discrepancies. We mention possible physical
mechanisms that enter the derivation of that dynamics, where a low-frequency
localization is combined with photon cooling as result of e.g. induced Compton
scattering. In that sense, the so called ‘space roar’ we observe today is
interpreted as a nonequilibrium echo of the early universe.

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