Modeling intrinsic time-lags in flaring blazars in the context of Lorentz Invariance Violation searches. (arXiv:2110.06734v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Levy_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Christelle Levy</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Sol_H/0/1/0/all/0/1">H&#xe9;l&#xe8;ne Sol</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Bolmont_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Julien Bolmont</a>

Some Quantum Gravity (QG) theories, aiming at unifying general relativity and
quantum mechanics, predict an energy-dependent modified dispersion relation for
photons in vacuum leading to a Violation of Lorentz Invariance (LIV). One way
to test these theories is to monitor TeV photons time-of-flight emitted by
distant, highly energetic and highly variable astrophysical sources such as
flaring active galactic nuclei. Only one time-lag detection was reported so
far. We have recently shown however that significant intrinsic time-lags should
arise from in situ blazar emission processes at TeV energies and should
consequently interfere with LIV searches. In this contribution we will review
how intrinsic time delays and LIV-induced propagation effects can
simultaneously impact blazars’ observed spectral energy distributions and
lightcurves. Using a time-dependent approach, we provide predictions on both
contributions for various cases in the frame of a standard one zone
synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) model. We will also introduce hints and methods
on how to disentangle intrinsic time delays from extrinsic ones in order to
highlight LIV effects.

Some Quantum Gravity (QG) theories, aiming at unifying general relativity and
quantum mechanics, predict an energy-dependent modified dispersion relation for
photons in vacuum leading to a Violation of Lorentz Invariance (LIV). One way
to test these theories is to monitor TeV photons time-of-flight emitted by
distant, highly energetic and highly variable astrophysical sources such as
flaring active galactic nuclei. Only one time-lag detection was reported so
far. We have recently shown however that significant intrinsic time-lags should
arise from in situ blazar emission processes at TeV energies and should
consequently interfere with LIV searches. In this contribution we will review
how intrinsic time delays and LIV-induced propagation effects can
simultaneously impact blazars’ observed spectral energy distributions and
lightcurves. Using a time-dependent approach, we provide predictions on both
contributions for various cases in the frame of a standard one zone
synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) model. We will also introduce hints and methods
on how to disentangle intrinsic time delays from extrinsic ones in order to
highlight LIV effects.

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