Measuring total neutrino cross section with IceCube at intermediate energies ($sim$100 GeV to a few TeV). (arXiv:2107.09764v1 [astro-ph.HE])

Measuring total neutrino cross section with IceCube at intermediate energies ($sim$100 GeV to a few TeV). (arXiv:2107.09764v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Nowicki_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Sarah Nowicki</a> (for the IceCube Collaboration)

Whether studying neutrinos for their own sake or as a messenger particle,
neutrino cross sections are critically important for numerous analyses. On the
low energy side, measurements from accelerator experiments reach up to a few
100s of GeV. On the high energy side, neutrino-earth absorption measurements
extend down to a few TeV. The intermediate energy range has yet to be measured
experimentally. This work is made possible by the linear relationship between
the event rate and cross section, and will utilize IceCube muon neutrino data
collected between 2010 and 2018. An advanced energy reconstruction, tailored to
the unique properties of the energy range and using the full description of
photon propagation in ice, is applied to an event sample of neutrino-induced
through-going muons to perform a forward folding analysis.

Whether studying neutrinos for their own sake or as a messenger particle,
neutrino cross sections are critically important for numerous analyses. On the
low energy side, measurements from accelerator experiments reach up to a few
100s of GeV. On the high energy side, neutrino-earth absorption measurements
extend down to a few TeV. The intermediate energy range has yet to be measured
experimentally. This work is made possible by the linear relationship between
the event rate and cross section, and will utilize IceCube muon neutrino data
collected between 2010 and 2018. An advanced energy reconstruction, tailored to
the unique properties of the energy range and using the full description of
photon propagation in ice, is applied to an event sample of neutrino-induced
through-going muons to perform a forward folding analysis.

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