How does a dark compact object ringdown?. (arXiv:2006.14628v1 [gr-qc])

How does a dark compact object ringdown?. (arXiv:2006.14628v1 [gr-qc])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Maggio_E/0/1/0/all/0/1">Elisa Maggio</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Buoninfante_L/0/1/0/all/0/1">Luca Buoninfante</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Mazumdar_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Anupam Mazumdar</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Pani_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Paolo Pani</a>

A generic feature of nearly out-of-equilibrium dissipative systems is that
they resonate through a set of quasinormal modes. Black holes – the absorbing
objects par excellence – are no exception. When formed in a merger, black holes
vibrate in a process called “ringdown”, which leaves the gravitational-wave
footprint of the event horizon. In some models of quantum gravity which attempt
to solve the information-loss paradox and the singularities of General
Relativity, black holes are replaced by regular, horizonless objects with a
tiny effective reflectivity. Motivated by these scenarios, here we develop a
generic framework to the study of the ringdown of a compact object with various
shades of darkness. By extending the black-hole membrane paradigm, we map the
interior of any compact object in terms of the bulk and shear viscosities of a
fictitious fluid located at the surface, with the black-hole limit being a
single point in a three-dimensional parameter space. We unveil some remarkable
features of the ringdown and some universal properties of the light ring in
this framework. We also identify the region of the parameter space which can be
probed by current and future gravitational-wave detectors. A general feature is
the appearance of mode doublets which are degenerate only in the black-hole
limit. We argue that the merger event GW150914 already imposes a strong lower
bound on the compactness of the merger remnant of approximately 99% of the
black-hole compactness. This places model-independent constraints on black-hole
alternatives such as diffuse “fuzzballs” and nonlocal stars.

A generic feature of nearly out-of-equilibrium dissipative systems is that
they resonate through a set of quasinormal modes. Black holes – the absorbing
objects par excellence – are no exception. When formed in a merger, black holes
vibrate in a process called “ringdown”, which leaves the gravitational-wave
footprint of the event horizon. In some models of quantum gravity which attempt
to solve the information-loss paradox and the singularities of General
Relativity, black holes are replaced by regular, horizonless objects with a
tiny effective reflectivity. Motivated by these scenarios, here we develop a
generic framework to the study of the ringdown of a compact object with various
shades of darkness. By extending the black-hole membrane paradigm, we map the
interior of any compact object in terms of the bulk and shear viscosities of a
fictitious fluid located at the surface, with the black-hole limit being a
single point in a three-dimensional parameter space. We unveil some remarkable
features of the ringdown and some universal properties of the light ring in
this framework. We also identify the region of the parameter space which can be
probed by current and future gravitational-wave detectors. A general feature is
the appearance of mode doublets which are degenerate only in the black-hole
limit. We argue that the merger event GW150914 already imposes a strong lower
bound on the compactness of the merger remnant of approximately 99% of the
black-hole compactness. This places model-independent constraints on black-hole
alternatives such as diffuse “fuzzballs” and nonlocal stars.

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