GRB 171205A: Hypernova and Newborn Neutron Star. (arXiv:2208.02725v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Wang_Y/0/1/0/all/0/1">Yu Wang</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Becerra_L/0/1/0/all/0/1">L. M. Becerra</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Fryer_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">C. L. Fryer</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Rueda_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">J. A. Rueda</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Ruffini_R/0/1/0/all/0/1">R. Ruffini</a>

GRB 171205A is a low-luminosity, long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB)
associated with SN 2017iuk, a broad-line type Ic supernova (SN). It is
consistent with being formed in the core-collapse of a single CO star, or in a
widely separated binary, which we have called the Binary driven Hypernova
(BdHN) of type III. The core-collapse of the CO star forms a newborn NS
($nu$NS) and the SN explosion. Fallback accretion transfers mass and angular
momentum to the $nu$NS. The accretion energy injected into the expanding
stellar layers powers the prompt emission. The multiwavelength power-law
afterglow is explained by the synchrotron radiation of electrons in the SN
ejecta, powered by energy injected by the spinning $nu$NS. We calculate the
amount of mass and angular momentum gained by the $nu$NS, as well as the
$nu$NS rotational evolution. The $nu$NS spins up to a period of $58$ ms, then
releases its rotational energy powering the synchrotron emission of the
afterglow. The paucity of the $nu$NS spin explains the low-luminosity
characteristic and that the optical emission of the SN from the nickel
radioactive decay outshines the optical emission from the synchrotron
radiation. From the $nu$NS evolution, we infer that the SN explosion had to
occur at most $7.36$ h before the GRB trigger. Therefore, for the first time,
the analysis of the GRB data leads to the time of occurrence of the associated
SN explosion, setting a stringent delay time between the neutrino emission
associated with the SN and the electromagnetic emission of the GRB event.

GRB 171205A is a low-luminosity, long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB)
associated with SN 2017iuk, a broad-line type Ic supernova (SN). It is
consistent with being formed in the core-collapse of a single CO star, or in a
widely separated binary, which we have called the Binary driven Hypernova
(BdHN) of type III. The core-collapse of the CO star forms a newborn NS
($nu$NS) and the SN explosion. Fallback accretion transfers mass and angular
momentum to the $nu$NS. The accretion energy injected into the expanding
stellar layers powers the prompt emission. The multiwavelength power-law
afterglow is explained by the synchrotron radiation of electrons in the SN
ejecta, powered by energy injected by the spinning $nu$NS. We calculate the
amount of mass and angular momentum gained by the $nu$NS, as well as the
$nu$NS rotational evolution. The $nu$NS spins up to a period of $58$ ms, then
releases its rotational energy powering the synchrotron emission of the
afterglow. The paucity of the $nu$NS spin explains the low-luminosity
characteristic and that the optical emission of the SN from the nickel
radioactive decay outshines the optical emission from the synchrotron
radiation. From the $nu$NS evolution, we infer that the SN explosion had to
occur at most $7.36$ h before the GRB trigger. Therefore, for the first time,
the analysis of the GRB data leads to the time of occurrence of the associated
SN explosion, setting a stringent delay time between the neutrino emission
associated with the SN and the electromagnetic emission of the GRB event.

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