Gender Disparity in Publishing Six Months after the KITP Workshop “Probes of Transport in Stars”. (arXiv:2206.10617v1 [astro-ph.IM])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Joyce_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Meridith Joyce</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Tayar_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Jamie Tayar</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Lecoanet_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">Daniel Lecoanet</a>

Conferences and workshops shape scientific discourse. The Kavli Institute for
Theoretical Physics (KITP) hosts long-term workshops to stimulate scientific
collaboration that would not otherwise have taken place. One goal of KITP
programs is to increase diversity in the next generation of scientists. In this
analysis, we examine gender trends in authorship of papers generated as a
result of the KITP program textit{Probes of Transport in Stars}, which ran
from October 11th, 2021 to December 17th, 2021. While 38% of workshop
participants were women, only 19% of publications produced between December
1st, 2021 and June 3rd, 2022 had female first-authors. Further, of these early
publications, 61% had all-male author lists. Among publications resulting from
the KITP program, the proportions of both male first-author papers and papers
with all-male author lists are higher than predicted by models that take into
account the gender distribution of the KITP participants. These results
motivate more thorough investigations of collaboration networks at scientific
conferences and workshops. Importantly, they also suggest that programs,
conferences, and workshops of any kind need to take steps beyond those
implemented in this KITP program to enable more diverse collaborations and
address gender disparities in science.

Conferences and workshops shape scientific discourse. The Kavli Institute for
Theoretical Physics (KITP) hosts long-term workshops to stimulate scientific
collaboration that would not otherwise have taken place. One goal of KITP
programs is to increase diversity in the next generation of scientists. In this
analysis, we examine gender trends in authorship of papers generated as a
result of the KITP program textit{Probes of Transport in Stars}, which ran
from October 11th, 2021 to December 17th, 2021. While 38% of workshop
participants were women, only 19% of publications produced between December
1st, 2021 and June 3rd, 2022 had female first-authors. Further, of these early
publications, 61% had all-male author lists. Among publications resulting from
the KITP program, the proportions of both male first-author papers and papers
with all-male author lists are higher than predicted by models that take into
account the gender distribution of the KITP participants. These results
motivate more thorough investigations of collaboration networks at scientific
conferences and workshops. Importantly, they also suggest that programs,
conferences, and workshops of any kind need to take steps beyond those
implemented in this KITP program to enable more diverse collaborations and
address gender disparities in science.

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