Disk Masses and Dust Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks Around Brown Dwarfs. (arXiv:2106.05247v1 [astro-ph.SR])

Disk Masses and Dust Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks Around Brown Dwarfs. (arXiv:2106.05247v1 [astro-ph.SR])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Rilinger_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Anneliese M. Rilinger</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Espaillat_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Catherine C. Espaillat</a>

We present the largest sample of brown dwarf (BD) protoplanetary disk
spectral energy distributions modeled to date. We compile 46 objects with ALMA
observations from four star-forming regions: $rho$ Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus,
and Upper Scorpius. Studying multiple regions with various ages enables us to
probe disk evolution over time. Specifically, from our models we obtain values
for dust grain sizes, dust settling, and disk mass; we compare how each of
these parameters vary between the regions. We find that disk mass generally
decreases with age, though the youngest region, Ophiuchus, has the lowest disk
masses. We find evidence of disk evolution (i.e., grain growth and significant
dust settling) in all four regions, indicating that planet formation and disk
evolution may begin to occur at earlier stages. We generally find these disks
contain too little mass to form planetary companions, though we cannot rule out
that planet formation may have already occurred. Finally, we examine the disk
mass — host mass relationship and find that BD disks are largely consistent
with previously-determined relationships for disks around T Tauri stars.

We present the largest sample of brown dwarf (BD) protoplanetary disk
spectral energy distributions modeled to date. We compile 46 objects with ALMA
observations from four star-forming regions: $rho$ Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus,
and Upper Scorpius. Studying multiple regions with various ages enables us to
probe disk evolution over time. Specifically, from our models we obtain values
for dust grain sizes, dust settling, and disk mass; we compare how each of
these parameters vary between the regions. We find that disk mass generally
decreases with age, though the youngest region, Ophiuchus, has the lowest disk
masses. We find evidence of disk evolution (i.e., grain growth and significant
dust settling) in all four regions, indicating that planet formation and disk
evolution may begin to occur at earlier stages. We generally find these disks
contain too little mass to form planetary companions, though we cannot rule out
that planet formation may have already occurred. Finally, we examine the disk
mass — host mass relationship and find that BD disks are largely consistent
with previously-determined relationships for disks around T Tauri stars.

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