Diffuse Interplanetary Radio Emission: Shock Emission or a Type III storm?. (arXiv:2011.12763v1 [astro-ph.SR])

Diffuse Interplanetary Radio Emission: Shock Emission or a Type III storm?. (arXiv:2011.12763v1 [astro-ph.SR])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Gopalswamy_N/0/1/0/all/0/1">Nat Gopalswamy</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Akiyama_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Sachiko Akiyama</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Makela_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Pertti M&#xe4;kel&#xe4;</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Yashiro_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Seiji Yashiro</a>

We present a clear case of a Diffuse Interplanetary Radio Emission (DIRE)
event observed during 2002 March 11-12 in association with a fast coronal mass
ejection (CME). In the previous event reported [1], there were two CMEs, and a
detailed analysis was required to pin down the underlying CME. In the event
presented here, the CME association is unambiguous, and the DIRE is found to
originate from the flanks of the CME-driven shock. We also provide quantitative
explanation for not observing radio emission from the shock nose. We also
clarify that DIRE is not a type III storm because the latter occurs outside of
solar eruptions.

We present a clear case of a Diffuse Interplanetary Radio Emission (DIRE)
event observed during 2002 March 11-12 in association with a fast coronal mass
ejection (CME). In the previous event reported [1], there were two CMEs, and a
detailed analysis was required to pin down the underlying CME. In the event
presented here, the CME association is unambiguous, and the DIRE is found to
originate from the flanks of the CME-driven shock. We also provide quantitative
explanation for not observing radio emission from the shock nose. We also
clarify that DIRE is not a type III storm because the latter occurs outside of
solar eruptions.

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