Cosmic voids and filaments from quantum gravity. (arXiv:2101.08617v1 [gr-qc])

Cosmic voids and filaments from quantum gravity. (arXiv:2101.08617v1 [gr-qc])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Ambjorn_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">J. Ambjorn</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Drogosz_Z/0/1/0/all/0/1">Z. Drogosz</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Gizbert_Studnicki_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">J. Gizbert-Studnicki</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Gorlich_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">A. G&#xf6;rlich</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Jurkiewicz_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">J. Jurkiewicz</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/gr-qc/1/au:+Nemeth_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">D. N&#xe9;meth</a>

Using computer simulations we study the geometry of a typical quantum
universe, i.e. the geometry one might expect before a possible period of
inflation. We display it using coordinates defined by means of four classical
scalar fields satisfying the Laplace equation with non-trivial boundary
conditions. The field configurations reveal cosmic web structures surprisingly
similar to the ones observed in the present-day Universe. Inflation might make
these structures relevant for our Universe.

Using computer simulations we study the geometry of a typical quantum
universe, i.e. the geometry one might expect before a possible period of
inflation. We display it using coordinates defined by means of four classical
scalar fields satisfying the Laplace equation with non-trivial boundary
conditions. The field configurations reveal cosmic web structures surprisingly
similar to the ones observed in the present-day Universe. Inflation might make
these structures relevant for our Universe.

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