A two-sided but significantly beamed jet in the supercritical accretion quasar IRAS F11119+3257. (arXiv:2003.11427v1 [astro-ph.HE])

A two-sided but significantly beamed jet in the supercritical accretion quasar IRAS F11119+3257. (arXiv:2003.11427v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Yang_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Jun Yang</a> (1), <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Paragi_Z/0/1/0/all/0/1">Zsolt Paragi</a> (2), <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+An_T/0/1/0/all/0/1">Tao An</a> (3), <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Baan_W/0/1/0/all/0/1">Willem A. Baan</a> (4 and 5), <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Mohan_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Prashanth Mohan</a> (3), <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Liu_X/0/1/0/all/0/1">Xiang Liu</a> (5) ((1) Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, (2) JIVE, Netherlands, (3) Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China, (4) ASTRON, Netherlands and (5) Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, China)

Highly accreting quasars are quite luminous in the X-ray and optical regimes.
While, they tend to become radio quiet and have optically thin radio spectra.
Among the known quasars, IRAS F11119+3257 is a supercritical accretion source
because it has a bolometric luminosity above the Eddington limit and extremely
powerful X-ray outflows. To probe its radio structure, we investigated its
radio spectrum between 0.15 and 96.15 GHz and performed very-long-baseline
interferometric (VLBI) observations with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at
1.66 and 4.93 GHz. The deep EVN image at 1.66 GHz shows a two-sided jet with a
projected separation about two hundred parsec and a very high flux density
ratio of about 290. Together with the best-fit value of the integrated spectral
index of -1.31+/-0.02 in the optically thin part, we infer that the approaching
jet has an intrinsic speed at least 0.57 times of the light speed. This is a
new record among the known all kinds of super-Eddington accreting sources and
unlikely accelerated by the radiation pressure. We propose a scenario in which
IRAS F11119+3257 is an unusual compact symmetric object with a small jet
viewing angle and a radio spectrum peaking at 0.53+/-0.06 GHz mainly due to the
synchrotron self-absorption.

Highly accreting quasars are quite luminous in the X-ray and optical regimes.
While, they tend to become radio quiet and have optically thin radio spectra.
Among the known quasars, IRAS F11119+3257 is a supercritical accretion source
because it has a bolometric luminosity above the Eddington limit and extremely
powerful X-ray outflows. To probe its radio structure, we investigated its
radio spectrum between 0.15 and 96.15 GHz and performed very-long-baseline
interferometric (VLBI) observations with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at
1.66 and 4.93 GHz. The deep EVN image at 1.66 GHz shows a two-sided jet with a
projected separation about two hundred parsec and a very high flux density
ratio of about 290. Together with the best-fit value of the integrated spectral
index of -1.31+/-0.02 in the optically thin part, we infer that the approaching
jet has an intrinsic speed at least 0.57 times of the light speed. This is a
new record among the known all kinds of super-Eddington accreting sources and
unlikely accelerated by the radiation pressure. We propose a scenario in which
IRAS F11119+3257 is an unusual compact symmetric object with a small jet
viewing angle and a radio spectrum peaking at 0.53+/-0.06 GHz mainly due to the
synchrotron self-absorption.

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