X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Emission From Core-collapse Supernovae: Comparison of Three-dimensional Neutrino-driven Explosions With SN 1987A. (arXiv:1906.04185v1 [astro-ph.HE])

X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Emission From Core-collapse Supernovae: Comparison of Three-dimensional Neutrino-driven Explosions With SN 1987A. (arXiv:1906.04185v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Alp_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">Dennis Alp</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Larsson_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Josefin Larsson</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Maeda_K/0/1/0/all/0/1">Keiichi Maeda</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Fransson_C/0/1/0/all/0/1">Claes Fransson</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Wongwathanarat_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Annop Wongwathanarat</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Gabler_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Michael Gabler</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Janka_H/0/1/0/all/0/1">Hans-Thomas Janka</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Jerkstrand_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Anders Jerkstrand</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Heger_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Alexander Heger</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Menon_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">Athira Menon</a>

During the first few hundred days after the explosion, core-collapse
supernovae (SNe) emit down-scattered X-rays and gamma-rays originating from
radioactive line emissions, primarily from the $^{56}$Ni $rightarrow$
$^{56}$Co $rightarrow$ $^{56}$Fe chain. We use SN models based on
three-dimensional neutrino-driven explosion simulations of single stars and
mergers to compute this emission and compare the predictions with observations
of SN 1987A. A number of models are clearly excluded, showing that high-energy
emission is a powerful way of discriminating between models. The best models
are almost consistent with the observations, but differences that cannot be
matched by a suitable choice of viewing angle are evident. Therefore, our
self-consistent models suggest that neutrino-driven explosions are able to
produce, in principle, sufficient mixing, although remaining discrepancies may
require small changes to the progenitor structures. The soft X-ray cutoff is
primarily determined by the metallicity of the progenitor envelope. The main
effect of asymmetries is to vary the flux level by a factor of ${sim}$3. For
the more asymmetric models, the shapes of the light curves also change. In
addition to the models of SN 1987A, we investigate two models of Type II-P SNe
and one model of a stripped-envelope Type IIb SN. The Type II-P models have
similar observables as the models of SN 1987A, but the stripped-envelope SN
model is significantly more luminous and evolves faster. NuSTAR should be able
to detect (non-)stripped SNe out to distances of (3)10 Mpc, which implies that
a core-collapse SN is expected to be detectable every three years.

During the first few hundred days after the explosion, core-collapse
supernovae (SNe) emit down-scattered X-rays and gamma-rays originating from
radioactive line emissions, primarily from the $^{56}$Ni $rightarrow$
$^{56}$Co $rightarrow$ $^{56}$Fe chain. We use SN models based on
three-dimensional neutrino-driven explosion simulations of single stars and
mergers to compute this emission and compare the predictions with observations
of SN 1987A. A number of models are clearly excluded, showing that high-energy
emission is a powerful way of discriminating between models. The best models
are almost consistent with the observations, but differences that cannot be
matched by a suitable choice of viewing angle are evident. Therefore, our
self-consistent models suggest that neutrino-driven explosions are able to
produce, in principle, sufficient mixing, although remaining discrepancies may
require small changes to the progenitor structures. The soft X-ray cutoff is
primarily determined by the metallicity of the progenitor envelope. The main
effect of asymmetries is to vary the flux level by a factor of ${sim}$3. For
the more asymmetric models, the shapes of the light curves also change. In
addition to the models of SN 1987A, we investigate two models of Type II-P SNe
and one model of a stripped-envelope Type IIb SN. The Type II-P models have
similar observables as the models of SN 1987A, but the stripped-envelope SN
model is significantly more luminous and evolves faster. NuSTAR should be able
to detect (non-)stripped SNe out to distances of (3)10 Mpc, which implies that
a core-collapse SN is expected to be detectable every three years.

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