The Structure of Dark Molecular Gas in the Galaxy — II. Physical State of “CO-Dark” Gas in the Perseus Arm. (arXiv:1908.04829v1 [astro-ph.GA])

The Structure of Dark Molecular Gas in the Galaxy — II. Physical State of “CO-Dark” Gas in the Perseus Arm. (arXiv:1908.04829v1 [astro-ph.GA])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Busch_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Michael P. Busch</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Allen_R/0/1/0/all/0/1">Ronald J. Allen</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Engelke_P/0/1/0/all/0/1">Philip D. Engelke</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Hogg_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">David E. Hogg</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Neufeld_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">David A. Neufeld</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Wolfire_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Mark G. Wolfire</a>

We report the results from a new, highly sensitive ($Delta T_{mb} sim 3
$mK) survey for thermal OH emission at 1665 and 1667 MHz over a dense, 9 x
9-pixel grid covering a $1deg$ x $1deg$ patch of sky in the direction of $l =
105deg, b = +2.50deg$ towards the Perseus spiral arm of our Galaxy. We
compare our Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 1667 MHz OH results with archival CO
J=1-0 observations from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO)
Outer Galaxy Survey within the velocity range of the Perseus Arm at these
galactic coordinates. Out of the 81 statistically-independent pointings in our
survey area, 86% show detectable OH emission at 1667 MHz, and 19% of them show
detectable CO emission. We explore the possible physical conditions of the
observed features using a set of diffuse molecular cloud models. In the context
of these models, both OH and CO disappear at current sensitivity limits below
an A$_{rm v}$ of 0.2, but the CO emission does not appear until the volume
density exceeds 100-200 cm$^{-3}$. These results demonstrate that a combination
of low column density A$_{rm v}$ and low volume density $n_{H}$ can explain
the lack of CO emission along sight lines exhibiting OH emission. The 18-cm OH
main lines, with their low critical density of $n^{*}$ $ sim 1 $ cm$^{-3}$,
are collisionally excited over a large fraction of the quiescent galactic
environment and, for observations of sufficient sensitivity, provide an
optically-thin radio tracer for diffuse H$_2$.

We report the results from a new, highly sensitive ($Delta T_{mb} sim 3
$mK) survey for thermal OH emission at 1665 and 1667 MHz over a dense, 9 x
9-pixel grid covering a $1deg$ x $1deg$ patch of sky in the direction of $l =
105deg, b = +2.50deg$ towards the Perseus spiral arm of our Galaxy. We
compare our Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 1667 MHz OH results with archival CO
J=1-0 observations from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO)
Outer Galaxy Survey within the velocity range of the Perseus Arm at these
galactic coordinates. Out of the 81 statistically-independent pointings in our
survey area, 86% show detectable OH emission at 1667 MHz, and 19% of them show
detectable CO emission. We explore the possible physical conditions of the
observed features using a set of diffuse molecular cloud models. In the context
of these models, both OH and CO disappear at current sensitivity limits below
an A$_{rm v}$ of 0.2, but the CO emission does not appear until the volume
density exceeds 100-200 cm$^{-3}$. These results demonstrate that a combination
of low column density A$_{rm v}$ and low volume density $n_{H}$ can explain
the lack of CO emission along sight lines exhibiting OH emission. The 18-cm OH
main lines, with their low critical density of $n^{*}$ $ sim 1 $ cm$^{-3}$,
are collisionally excited over a large fraction of the quiescent galactic
environment and, for observations of sufficient sensitivity, provide an
optically-thin radio tracer for diffuse H$_2$.

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