The dark side of supergiant High-Mass X-ray Binaries. (arXiv:1901.03593v1 [astro-ph.HE])

The dark side of supergiant High-Mass X-ray Binaries. (arXiv:1901.03593v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Chaty_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Sylvain Chaty</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Fortin_F/0/1/0/all/0/1">Francis Fortin</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Garcia_F/0/1/0/all/0/1">Federico Garc&#xed;a</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Fogantini_F/0/1/0/all/0/1">Federico Fogantini</a>

High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXB) have been revealed by a wealth of
multi-wavelength observations, from X-ray to optical and infrared domain. After
describing the 3 different kinds of HMXB, we focus on 3 HMXB hosting supergiant
stars: IGR J16320-4751, IGR J16465-4507 and IGR J16318-4848, respectively
called “The Good”, “The Bad” and “The Ugly”.

We review in these proceedings what the observations of these sources have
brought to light concerning our knowledge of HMXB, and what part still remains
in the dark side. Many questions are still pending, related to accretion
processes, stellar wind properties in these massive and active stars, and the
overall evolution due to transfer of mass and angular momentum between the
companion star and the compact object. Future observations should be able to
answer these questions, which constitute the dark side of HMXB.

High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXB) have been revealed by a wealth of
multi-wavelength observations, from X-ray to optical and infrared domain. After
describing the 3 different kinds of HMXB, we focus on 3 HMXB hosting supergiant
stars: IGR J16320-4751, IGR J16465-4507 and IGR J16318-4848, respectively
called “The Good”, “The Bad” and “The Ugly”.

We review in these proceedings what the observations of these sources have
brought to light concerning our knowledge of HMXB, and what part still remains
in the dark side. Many questions are still pending, related to accretion
processes, stellar wind properties in these massive and active stars, and the
overall evolution due to transfer of mass and angular momentum between the
companion star and the compact object. Future observations should be able to
answer these questions, which constitute the dark side of HMXB.

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