Sparse Image Reconstruction for the SPIDER Optical Interferometric Telescope. (arXiv:1903.05638v1 [astro-ph.IM])

Sparse Image Reconstruction for the SPIDER Optical Interferometric Telescope. (arXiv:1903.05638v1 [astro-ph.IM])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Pratley_L/0/1/0/all/0/1">Luke Pratley</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+McEwen_J/0/1/0/all/0/1">Jason D. McEwen</a>

The concept of a recently proposed small-scale interferometric optical
imaging device, an instrument known as the Segmented Planar Imaging Detector
for Electro-optical Reconnaissance (SPIDER), is of great interest for its
possible applications in astronomy and space science. Due to low weight, low
power consumption, and high resolution, the SPIDER telescope could replace the
large space telescopes that exist today. Unlike traditional optical
interferometry the SPIDER accurately retrieves both phase and amplitude
information, making the measurement process analogous to a radio
interferometer. State of the art sparse radio interferometric image
reconstruction techniques have been gaining traction in radio astronomy and
reconstruct accurate images of the radio sky. In this work we describe
algorithms from radio interferometric imaging and sparse image reconstruction
and demonstrate their application to the SPIDER concept telescope through
simulated observation and reconstruction of the optical sky. Such algorithms
are important for providing high fidelity images from SPIDER observations,
helping to power the SPIDER concept for scientific and astronomical analysis.

The concept of a recently proposed small-scale interferometric optical
imaging device, an instrument known as the Segmented Planar Imaging Detector
for Electro-optical Reconnaissance (SPIDER), is of great interest for its
possible applications in astronomy and space science. Due to low weight, low
power consumption, and high resolution, the SPIDER telescope could replace the
large space telescopes that exist today. Unlike traditional optical
interferometry the SPIDER accurately retrieves both phase and amplitude
information, making the measurement process analogous to a radio
interferometer. State of the art sparse radio interferometric image
reconstruction techniques have been gaining traction in radio astronomy and
reconstruct accurate images of the radio sky. In this work we describe
algorithms from radio interferometric imaging and sparse image reconstruction
and demonstrate their application to the SPIDER concept telescope through
simulated observation and reconstruction of the optical sky. Such algorithms
are important for providing high fidelity images from SPIDER observations,
helping to power the SPIDER concept for scientific and astronomical analysis.

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