Observational constraints on the survival of pristine stars. (arXiv:1903.08661v1 [astro-ph.GA])

Observational constraints on the survival of pristine stars. (arXiv:1903.08661v1 [astro-ph.GA])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Magg_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">Mattis Magg</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Klessen_R/0/1/0/all/0/1">Ralf S. Klessen</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Glover_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Simon C. O. Glover</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Li_H/0/1/0/all/0/1">Haining Li</a>

There is a longstanding discussion about whether low mass stars can form from
pristine gas in the early Universe. A particular point of interest is whether
we can find surviving pristine stars from the first generation in our local
neighbourhood. We present here a simple analytical estimate that puts tighter
constraints on the existence of such stars.In the conventional picture, should
these stars have formed in significant numbers and have preserved their
pristine chemical composition until today, we should have found them already.

There is a longstanding discussion about whether low mass stars can form from
pristine gas in the early Universe. A particular point of interest is whether
we can find surviving pristine stars from the first generation in our local
neighbourhood. We present here a simple analytical estimate that puts tighter
constraints on the existence of such stars.In the conventional picture, should
these stars have formed in significant numbers and have preserved their
pristine chemical composition until today, we should have found them already.

http://arxiv.org/icons/sfx.gif

Comments are closed.