Models of a protoplanetary disk forming in-situ the major Uranian satellites before the planet is fully formed. (arXiv:1901.06448v1 [astro-ph.EP])

Models of a protoplanetary disk forming in-situ the major Uranian satellites before the planet is fully formed. (arXiv:1901.06448v1 [astro-ph.EP])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Christodoulou_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">Dimitris M. Christodoulou</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Kazanas_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">Demosthenes Kazanas</a>

We fit an isothermal oscillatory density model of Uranus’ protoplanetary disk
to the present-day major satellites and we determine the radial scale length of
the disk, the equation of state and the central density of the primordial gas,
and the rotational state of the Uranian nebula. This disk does not at all look
like the Jovian disk that we modeled previously. Its rotation parameter that
measures centrifugal support against self-gravity is a lot smaller
($beta_0=0.00507$), as is the radial scale length (only 27.6 km) and the size
of the disk (only 0.60 Gm). On the other hand, the central density of the
compact Uranian core is higher by a factor of 180 and its angular velocity is
about 2.3 times that of Jupiter’s core (a rotation period of 3.0 d as opposed
to 6.8 d). Yet, the rotation of the disk is sufficiently slow to guarantee its
long-term dynamical stability against self-gravity induced instabilities for
millions of years.

We fit an isothermal oscillatory density model of Uranus’ protoplanetary disk
to the present-day major satellites and we determine the radial scale length of
the disk, the equation of state and the central density of the primordial gas,
and the rotational state of the Uranian nebula. This disk does not at all look
like the Jovian disk that we modeled previously. Its rotation parameter that
measures centrifugal support against self-gravity is a lot smaller
($beta_0=0.00507$), as is the radial scale length (only 27.6 km) and the size
of the disk (only 0.60 Gm). On the other hand, the central density of the
compact Uranian core is higher by a factor of 180 and its angular velocity is
about 2.3 times that of Jupiter’s core (a rotation period of 3.0 d as opposed
to 6.8 d). Yet, the rotation of the disk is sufficiently slow to guarantee its
long-term dynamical stability against self-gravity induced instabilities for
millions of years.

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