In the Presence of a Wrecking Ball: Orbital Stability in the HR 5183 System. (arXiv:1910.03626v1 [astro-ph.EP])

In the Presence of a Wrecking Ball: Orbital Stability in the HR 5183 System. (arXiv:1910.03626v1 [astro-ph.EP])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Kane_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Stephen R. Kane</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Blunt_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">Sarah Blunt</a>

Discoveries of exoplanets using the radial velocity method are progressively
reaching out to increasingly longer orbital periods as the duration of surveys
continues to climb. The improving sensitivity to potential Jupiter analogs is
revealing a diversity of orbital architectures that are substantially different
from that found in our solar system. An excellent example of this is the recent
discovery of HR 5183b; a giant planet on a highly eccentric ($e = 0.84$)
$sim$75~year orbit. The presence of such giant planet orbits are intrinsically
interesting from the perspective of the dynamical history of planetary systems,
and also for examining the implications of on-going dynamical stability and
habitability of these systems. In this work, we examine the latter, providing
results of dynamical simulations that explore the stable regions that the
eccentric orbit of the HR 5183 giant planet allows to exist within the
Habitable Zone of the host star. Our results show that, despite the incredible
perturbing influence of the giant planet, there remain a narrow range of
locations within the Habitable Zone where terrestrial planets may reside in
long-term stable orbits. We discuss the effects of the giant planet on the
potential habitability of a stable terrestrial planet, including the modulation
of terrestrial planet eccentricities and the periodically spectacular view of
the giant planet from the terrestrial planet location.

Discoveries of exoplanets using the radial velocity method are progressively
reaching out to increasingly longer orbital periods as the duration of surveys
continues to climb. The improving sensitivity to potential Jupiter analogs is
revealing a diversity of orbital architectures that are substantially different
from that found in our solar system. An excellent example of this is the recent
discovery of HR 5183b; a giant planet on a highly eccentric ($e = 0.84$)
$sim$75~year orbit. The presence of such giant planet orbits are intrinsically
interesting from the perspective of the dynamical history of planetary systems,
and also for examining the implications of on-going dynamical stability and
habitability of these systems. In this work, we examine the latter, providing
results of dynamical simulations that explore the stable regions that the
eccentric orbit of the HR 5183 giant planet allows to exist within the
Habitable Zone of the host star. Our results show that, despite the incredible
perturbing influence of the giant planet, there remain a narrow range of
locations within the Habitable Zone where terrestrial planets may reside in
long-term stable orbits. We discuss the effects of the giant planet on the
potential habitability of a stable terrestrial planet, including the modulation
of terrestrial planet eccentricities and the periodically spectacular view of
the giant planet from the terrestrial planet location.

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