High-energy cosmic rays from compact galactic star clusters: particle fluxes and anisotropy. (arXiv:1906.08813v1 [astro-ph.HE])

High-energy cosmic rays from compact galactic star clusters: particle fluxes and anisotropy. (arXiv:1906.08813v1 [astro-ph.HE])
<a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Bykov_A/0/1/0/all/0/1">A. M. Bykov</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Kalyashova_M/0/1/0/all/0/1">M. E. Kalyashova</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Ellison_D/0/1/0/all/0/1">D. C. Ellison</a>, <a href="http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:+Osipov_S/0/1/0/all/0/1">S. M. Osipov</a>

It has been shown that supernova blast waves interacting with winds from
massive stars in compact star clusters may be capable of producing cosmic-ray
(CR) protons to above $10^{17}$ eV. We give a brief description of the
colliding-shock-flows mechanism and look at generalizations of the diffusion of
~ 100 PeV CRs in the turbulent galactic magnetic field present in the galactic
disk. We calculate the temporal evolution of the CR anisotropy from a possible
distribution of young compact massive star clusters assuming the sources are
intermittent on time scales of a few million years, i.e., comparable to their
residence time in the Milky Way. Within the confines of our model, we determine
the galactic/extra-galactic fraction of high-energy CRs resulting in
anisotropies consistent with observed values. We find that galactic star
clusters may contribute a substantial fraction of ~ 100 PeV CRs without
producing anisotropies above observed limits.

It has been shown that supernova blast waves interacting with winds from
massive stars in compact star clusters may be capable of producing cosmic-ray
(CR) protons to above $10^{17}$ eV. We give a brief description of the
colliding-shock-flows mechanism and look at generalizations of the diffusion of
~ 100 PeV CRs in the turbulent galactic magnetic field present in the galactic
disk. We calculate the temporal evolution of the CR anisotropy from a possible
distribution of young compact massive star clusters assuming the sources are
intermittent on time scales of a few million years, i.e., comparable to their
residence time in the Milky Way. Within the confines of our model, we determine
the galactic/extra-galactic fraction of high-energy CRs resulting in
anisotropies consistent with observed values. We find that galactic star
clusters may contribute a substantial fraction of ~ 100 PeV CRs without
producing anisotropies above observed limits.

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